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We’re totally willing to admit that Valentine’s Day was invented by Hallmark. But that doesn’t mean it’s a bogus holiday. Even if it is, we still love the opportunity it gives us to cook for our sweethearts. Our Valentine’s Day box will be delivered on February 10th and 13th with all the ingredients you need to romance that new love. And to make it extra special, we’ve written a couple of recipes to feature two new add-on items. We’ve even got some sweet treats you can order in addition to your regular box.
Here’s the line up for our Valentine’s Day box: pasture-raised Osso Buco from Happy Valley Meat Company in Pennsylvania, a pair of Bijou cheeses from Vermont Creamery, gorgeous Beet Spaccatelli from Sfoglini Pasta, bibb lettuce, organic Cremini mushrooms, Ozette fingerling potatoes from Mountain Sweet Berry Farm, rosemary, garlic and a few other treats including some special Valentine’s Day linzer cookies from the pastry chef at Northern Spy.
The box comes with two recipes that feature the add-ons, so that you can see these ingredients shine. The real stunner in this box is one of my favorite cuts of meat, pasture-raised beef shank for making wine-braised Osso Buco. Simmered in wine for several hours, this meat is incredibly tender and flavorful. Serve it up with truffle toasts to spoon the marrow on to and soak up the tasty braising juice. You’ll want the Empire Mayo Co. white truffle mayonnaise for the toasts, along with some grated Parmigiano and plenty of black pepper. Those hours at the stove deliver an incredible pay off – just about the best winter dish. Ever. Take that, polar vortex!
Or, you can go the pasta route for Valentine’s Day. Try the beet Spaccatelli from Sfoglini with creamy Bijou cheese and topped with crispy garlic and rosemary leaves. Nothing says romance like this stunning pink pasta. And the perfect garnish – the Pinot Noir salt from Jacobsen Salt. They infuse their flaky sea salt with Willamette Valley Pinot Noir from Grochau Cellars. It adds an elegant and fragrant note to the dish. 
We’ll have four add-ons that you can purchase in addition to the regular box. Truffle mayo from Empire Mayonnaise, made in Brooklyn, is decadent and creamy - $8 for a four ounce jar. From the coast of Oregon we have Pinot Noir infused flaky sea salt made by Jacobsen Salt - $11 for a 1.5 ounce jar. And because Valentine’s Day isn’t Valentine’s Day without something sweet, we’re featuring sweets from two companies that are located in the Pfizer building, where we pack all of the Quinciple boxes. From Liddabit Sweets we have chocolate dipped sea salt caramels – a box of six is $10. And finally we have a trio of mini chocolate bars from Madecasse: sea salt and nibs, espresso bean and citrus and pink pepper - $10 for three bars. All prices include tax.

The full details of the Valentine’s Day box are here. Sign up anytime before February 7th to receive this box. You can order add-ons and ask us questions by emailing us at add-ons@quinciple.com. We’re totally willing to admit that Valentine’s Day was invented by Hallmark. But that doesn’t mean it’s a bogus holiday. Even if it is, we still love the opportunity it gives us to cook for our sweethearts. Our Valentine’s Day box will be delivered on February 10th and 13th with all the ingredients you need to romance that new love. And to make it extra special, we’ve written a couple of recipes to feature two new add-on items. We’ve even got some sweet treats you can order in addition to your regular box.
Here’s the line up for our Valentine’s Day box: pasture-raised Osso Buco from Happy Valley Meat Company in Pennsylvania, a pair of Bijou cheeses from Vermont Creamery, gorgeous Beet Spaccatelli from Sfoglini Pasta, bibb lettuce, organic Cremini mushrooms, Ozette fingerling potatoes from Mountain Sweet Berry Farm, rosemary, garlic and a few other treats including some special Valentine’s Day linzer cookies from the pastry chef at Northern Spy.
The box comes with two recipes that feature the add-ons, so that you can see these ingredients shine. The real stunner in this box is one of my favorite cuts of meat, pasture-raised beef shank for making wine-braised Osso Buco. Simmered in wine for several hours, this meat is incredibly tender and flavorful. Serve it up with truffle toasts to spoon the marrow on to and soak up the tasty braising juice. You’ll want the Empire Mayo Co. white truffle mayonnaise for the toasts, along with some grated Parmigiano and plenty of black pepper. Those hours at the stove deliver an incredible pay off – just about the best winter dish. Ever. Take that, polar vortex!
Or, you can go the pasta route for Valentine’s Day. Try the beet Spaccatelli from Sfoglini with creamy Bijou cheese and topped with crispy garlic and rosemary leaves. Nothing says romance like this stunning pink pasta. And the perfect garnish – the Pinot Noir salt from Jacobsen Salt. They infuse their flaky sea salt with Willamette Valley Pinot Noir from Grochau Cellars. It adds an elegant and fragrant note to the dish. 
We’ll have four add-ons that you can purchase in addition to the regular box. Truffle mayo from Empire Mayonnaise, made in Brooklyn, is decadent and creamy - $8 for a four ounce jar. From the coast of Oregon we have Pinot Noir infused flaky sea salt made by Jacobsen Salt - $11 for a 1.5 ounce jar. And because Valentine’s Day isn’t Valentine’s Day without something sweet, we’re featuring sweets from two companies that are located in the Pfizer building, where we pack all of the Quinciple boxes. From Liddabit Sweets we have chocolate dipped sea salt caramels – a box of six is $10. And finally we have a trio of mini chocolate bars from Madecasse: sea salt and nibs, espresso bean and citrus and pink pepper - $10 for three bars. All prices include tax.

The full details of the Valentine’s Day box are here. Sign up anytime before February 7th to receive this box. You can order add-ons and ask us questions by emailing us at add-ons@quinciple.com. We’re totally willing to admit that Valentine’s Day was invented by Hallmark. But that doesn’t mean it’s a bogus holiday. Even if it is, we still love the opportunity it gives us to cook for our sweethearts. Our Valentine’s Day box will be delivered on February 10th and 13th with all the ingredients you need to romance that new love. And to make it extra special, we’ve written a couple of recipes to feature two new add-on items. We’ve even got some sweet treats you can order in addition to your regular box.
Here’s the line up for our Valentine’s Day box: pasture-raised Osso Buco from Happy Valley Meat Company in Pennsylvania, a pair of Bijou cheeses from Vermont Creamery, gorgeous Beet Spaccatelli from Sfoglini Pasta, bibb lettuce, organic Cremini mushrooms, Ozette fingerling potatoes from Mountain Sweet Berry Farm, rosemary, garlic and a few other treats including some special Valentine’s Day linzer cookies from the pastry chef at Northern Spy.
The box comes with two recipes that feature the add-ons, so that you can see these ingredients shine. The real stunner in this box is one of my favorite cuts of meat, pasture-raised beef shank for making wine-braised Osso Buco. Simmered in wine for several hours, this meat is incredibly tender and flavorful. Serve it up with truffle toasts to spoon the marrow on to and soak up the tasty braising juice. You’ll want the Empire Mayo Co. white truffle mayonnaise for the toasts, along with some grated Parmigiano and plenty of black pepper. Those hours at the stove deliver an incredible pay off – just about the best winter dish. Ever. Take that, polar vortex!
Or, you can go the pasta route for Valentine’s Day. Try the beet Spaccatelli from Sfoglini with creamy Bijou cheese and topped with crispy garlic and rosemary leaves. Nothing says romance like this stunning pink pasta. And the perfect garnish – the Pinot Noir salt from Jacobsen Salt. They infuse their flaky sea salt with Willamette Valley Pinot Noir from Grochau Cellars. It adds an elegant and fragrant note to the dish. 
We’ll have four add-ons that you can purchase in addition to the regular box. Truffle mayo from Empire Mayonnaise, made in Brooklyn, is decadent and creamy - $8 for a four ounce jar. From the coast of Oregon we have Pinot Noir infused flaky sea salt made by Jacobsen Salt - $11 for a 1.5 ounce jar. And because Valentine’s Day isn’t Valentine’s Day without something sweet, we’re featuring sweets from two companies that are located in the Pfizer building, where we pack all of the Quinciple boxes. From Liddabit Sweets we have chocolate dipped sea salt caramels – a box of six is $10. And finally we have a trio of mini chocolate bars from Madecasse: sea salt and nibs, espresso bean and citrus and pink pepper - $10 for three bars. All prices include tax.

The full details of the Valentine’s Day box are here. Sign up anytime before February 7th to receive this box. You can order add-ons and ask us questions by emailing us at add-ons@quinciple.com. We’re totally willing to admit that Valentine’s Day was invented by Hallmark. But that doesn’t mean it’s a bogus holiday. Even if it is, we still love the opportunity it gives us to cook for our sweethearts. Our Valentine’s Day box will be delivered on February 10th and 13th with all the ingredients you need to romance that new love. And to make it extra special, we’ve written a couple of recipes to feature two new add-on items. We’ve even got some sweet treats you can order in addition to your regular box.
Here’s the line up for our Valentine’s Day box: pasture-raised Osso Buco from Happy Valley Meat Company in Pennsylvania, a pair of Bijou cheeses from Vermont Creamery, gorgeous Beet Spaccatelli from Sfoglini Pasta, bibb lettuce, organic Cremini mushrooms, Ozette fingerling potatoes from Mountain Sweet Berry Farm, rosemary, garlic and a few other treats including some special Valentine’s Day linzer cookies from the pastry chef at Northern Spy.
The box comes with two recipes that feature the add-ons, so that you can see these ingredients shine. The real stunner in this box is one of my favorite cuts of meat, pasture-raised beef shank for making wine-braised Osso Buco. Simmered in wine for several hours, this meat is incredibly tender and flavorful. Serve it up with truffle toasts to spoon the marrow on to and soak up the tasty braising juice. You’ll want the Empire Mayo Co. white truffle mayonnaise for the toasts, along with some grated Parmigiano and plenty of black pepper. Those hours at the stove deliver an incredible pay off – just about the best winter dish. Ever. Take that, polar vortex!
Or, you can go the pasta route for Valentine’s Day. Try the beet Spaccatelli from Sfoglini with creamy Bijou cheese and topped with crispy garlic and rosemary leaves. Nothing says romance like this stunning pink pasta. And the perfect garnish – the Pinot Noir salt from Jacobsen Salt. They infuse their flaky sea salt with Willamette Valley Pinot Noir from Grochau Cellars. It adds an elegant and fragrant note to the dish. 
We’ll have four add-ons that you can purchase in addition to the regular box. Truffle mayo from Empire Mayonnaise, made in Brooklyn, is decadent and creamy - $8 for a four ounce jar. From the coast of Oregon we have Pinot Noir infused flaky sea salt made by Jacobsen Salt - $11 for a 1.5 ounce jar. And because Valentine’s Day isn’t Valentine’s Day without something sweet, we’re featuring sweets from two companies that are located in the Pfizer building, where we pack all of the Quinciple boxes. From Liddabit Sweets we have chocolate dipped sea salt caramels – a box of six is $10. And finally we have a trio of mini chocolate bars from Madecasse: sea salt and nibs, espresso bean and citrus and pink pepper - $10 for three bars. All prices include tax.

The full details of the Valentine’s Day box are here. Sign up anytime before February 7th to receive this box. You can order add-ons and ask us questions by emailing us at add-ons@quinciple.com. We’re totally willing to admit that Valentine’s Day was invented by Hallmark. But that doesn’t mean it’s a bogus holiday. Even if it is, we still love the opportunity it gives us to cook for our sweethearts. Our Valentine’s Day box will be delivered on February 10th and 13th with all the ingredients you need to romance that new love. And to make it extra special, we’ve written a couple of recipes to feature two new add-on items. We’ve even got some sweet treats you can order in addition to your regular box.
Here’s the line up for our Valentine’s Day box: pasture-raised Osso Buco from Happy Valley Meat Company in Pennsylvania, a pair of Bijou cheeses from Vermont Creamery, gorgeous Beet Spaccatelli from Sfoglini Pasta, bibb lettuce, organic Cremini mushrooms, Ozette fingerling potatoes from Mountain Sweet Berry Farm, rosemary, garlic and a few other treats including some special Valentine’s Day linzer cookies from the pastry chef at Northern Spy.
The box comes with two recipes that feature the add-ons, so that you can see these ingredients shine. The real stunner in this box is one of my favorite cuts of meat, pasture-raised beef shank for making wine-braised Osso Buco. Simmered in wine for several hours, this meat is incredibly tender and flavorful. Serve it up with truffle toasts to spoon the marrow on to and soak up the tasty braising juice. You’ll want the Empire Mayo Co. white truffle mayonnaise for the toasts, along with some grated Parmigiano and plenty of black pepper. Those hours at the stove deliver an incredible pay off – just about the best winter dish. Ever. Take that, polar vortex!
Or, you can go the pasta route for Valentine’s Day. Try the beet Spaccatelli from Sfoglini with creamy Bijou cheese and topped with crispy garlic and rosemary leaves. Nothing says romance like this stunning pink pasta. And the perfect garnish – the Pinot Noir salt from Jacobsen Salt. They infuse their flaky sea salt with Willamette Valley Pinot Noir from Grochau Cellars. It adds an elegant and fragrant note to the dish. 
We’ll have four add-ons that you can purchase in addition to the regular box. Truffle mayo from Empire Mayonnaise, made in Brooklyn, is decadent and creamy - $8 for a four ounce jar. From the coast of Oregon we have Pinot Noir infused flaky sea salt made by Jacobsen Salt - $11 for a 1.5 ounce jar. And because Valentine’s Day isn’t Valentine’s Day without something sweet, we’re featuring sweets from two companies that are located in the Pfizer building, where we pack all of the Quinciple boxes. From Liddabit Sweets we have chocolate dipped sea salt caramels – a box of six is $10. And finally we have a trio of mini chocolate bars from Madecasse: sea salt and nibs, espresso bean and citrus and pink pepper - $10 for three bars. All prices include tax.

The full details of the Valentine’s Day box are here. Sign up anytime before February 7th to receive this box. You can order add-ons and ask us questions by emailing us at add-ons@quinciple.com. We’re totally willing to admit that Valentine’s Day was invented by Hallmark. But that doesn’t mean it’s a bogus holiday. Even if it is, we still love the opportunity it gives us to cook for our sweethearts. Our Valentine’s Day box will be delivered on February 10th and 13th with all the ingredients you need to romance that new love. And to make it extra special, we’ve written a couple of recipes to feature two new add-on items. We’ve even got some sweet treats you can order in addition to your regular box.
Here’s the line up for our Valentine’s Day box: pasture-raised Osso Buco from Happy Valley Meat Company in Pennsylvania, a pair of Bijou cheeses from Vermont Creamery, gorgeous Beet Spaccatelli from Sfoglini Pasta, bibb lettuce, organic Cremini mushrooms, Ozette fingerling potatoes from Mountain Sweet Berry Farm, rosemary, garlic and a few other treats including some special Valentine’s Day linzer cookies from the pastry chef at Northern Spy.
The box comes with two recipes that feature the add-ons, so that you can see these ingredients shine. The real stunner in this box is one of my favorite cuts of meat, pasture-raised beef shank for making wine-braised Osso Buco. Simmered in wine for several hours, this meat is incredibly tender and flavorful. Serve it up with truffle toasts to spoon the marrow on to and soak up the tasty braising juice. You’ll want the Empire Mayo Co. white truffle mayonnaise for the toasts, along with some grated Parmigiano and plenty of black pepper. Those hours at the stove deliver an incredible pay off – just about the best winter dish. Ever. Take that, polar vortex!
Or, you can go the pasta route for Valentine’s Day. Try the beet Spaccatelli from Sfoglini with creamy Bijou cheese and topped with crispy garlic and rosemary leaves. Nothing says romance like this stunning pink pasta. And the perfect garnish – the Pinot Noir salt from Jacobsen Salt. They infuse their flaky sea salt with Willamette Valley Pinot Noir from Grochau Cellars. It adds an elegant and fragrant note to the dish. 
We’ll have four add-ons that you can purchase in addition to the regular box. Truffle mayo from Empire Mayonnaise, made in Brooklyn, is decadent and creamy - $8 for a four ounce jar. From the coast of Oregon we have Pinot Noir infused flaky sea salt made by Jacobsen Salt - $11 for a 1.5 ounce jar. And because Valentine’s Day isn’t Valentine’s Day without something sweet, we’re featuring sweets from two companies that are located in the Pfizer building, where we pack all of the Quinciple boxes. From Liddabit Sweets we have chocolate dipped sea salt caramels – a box of six is $10. And finally we have a trio of mini chocolate bars from Madecasse: sea salt and nibs, espresso bean and citrus and pink pepper - $10 for three bars. All prices include tax.

The full details of the Valentine’s Day box are here. Sign up anytime before February 7th to receive this box. You can order add-ons and ask us questions by emailing us at add-ons@quinciple.com.

We’re totally willing to admit that Valentine’s Day was invented by Hallmark. But that doesn’t mean it’s a bogus holiday. Even if it is, we still love the opportunity it gives us to cook for our sweethearts. Our Valentine’s Day box will be delivered on February 10th and 13th with all the ingredients you need to romance that new love. And to make it extra special, we’ve written a couple of recipes to feature two new add-on items. We’ve even got some sweet treats you can order in addition to your regular box.

Here’s the line up for our Valentine’s Day box: pasture-raised Osso Buco from Happy Valley Meat Company in Pennsylvania, a pair of Bijou cheeses from Vermont Creamery, gorgeous Beet Spaccatelli from Sfoglini Pasta, bibb lettuce, organic Cremini mushrooms, Ozette fingerling potatoes from Mountain Sweet Berry Farm, rosemary, garlic and a few other treats including some special Valentine’s Day linzer cookies from the pastry chef at Northern Spy.

The box comes with two recipes that feature the add-ons, so that you can see these ingredients shine. The real stunner in this box is one of my favorite cuts of meat, pasture-raised beef shank for making wine-braised Osso Buco. Simmered in wine for several hours, this meat is incredibly tender and flavorful. Serve it up with truffle toasts to spoon the marrow on to and soak up the tasty braising juice. You’ll want the Empire Mayo Co. white truffle mayonnaise for the toasts, along with some grated Parmigiano and plenty of black pepper. Those hours at the stove deliver an incredible pay off – just about the best winter dish. Ever. Take that, polar vortex!

Or, you can go the pasta route for Valentine’s Day. Try the beet Spaccatelli from Sfoglini with creamy Bijou cheese and topped with crispy garlic and rosemary leaves. Nothing says romance like this stunning pink pasta. And the perfect garnish – the Pinot Noir salt from Jacobsen Salt. They infuse their flaky sea salt with Willamette Valley Pinot Noir from Grochau Cellars. It adds an elegant and fragrant note to the dish.

We’ll have four add-ons that you can purchase in addition to the regular box. Truffle mayo from Empire Mayonnaise, made in Brooklyn, is decadent and creamy - $8 for a four ounce jar. From the coast of Oregon we have Pinot Noir infused flaky sea salt made by Jacobsen Salt - $11 for a 1.5 ounce jar. And because Valentine’s Day isn’t Valentine’s Day without something sweet, we’re featuring sweets from two companies that are located in the Pfizer building, where we pack all of the Quinciple boxes. From Liddabit Sweets we have chocolate dipped sea salt caramels – a box of six is $10. And finally we have a trio of mini chocolate bars from Madecasse: sea salt and nibs, espresso bean and citrus and pink pepper - $10 for three bars. All prices include tax.

The full details of the Valentine’s Day box are here. Sign up anytime before February 7th to receive this box. You can order add-ons and ask us questions by emailing us at add-ons@quinciple.com.

Persimmon Bourbon Sour 
If you’re like me then your fridge contains a few sad carrots languishing at the bottom of the fridge. Because of that I’m particularly fond of recipes that take advantage of those wrinkled veggies hiding in the crisper drawer. This cocktail recipe is designed to make use of last week’s persimmons. They should be nice and ripe by now. Maybe even a little too ripe. But that is perfect for this cocktail. You’re using them to make a persimmon puree, so you need them soft and sweet. So drink up. And go buy some more fruit. You’ve got space in your fridge!
To make the persimmon puree, cut two very ripe, soft persimmons in half (if you’re not using the small fuyus from last week’s box then you can use one larger ripe hachiya persimmon). Scoop out the flesh and put it in a large mason jar with the juice from half a lemon. Puree with an immersion blender and pass through a fine mesh sieve to strain out any large bits.
For one drink, combine in a cocktail shaker with plenty of ice:
2 oz Bourbon1 oz Persimmon Puree¾ oz Maple Syrup, preferably Grade B2 dashes Angostura Bitters

Shake until very cold, strain into a chilled coupe glass and garnish with a bit of lemon peel.

Persimmon Bourbon Sour 

If you’re like me then your fridge contains a few sad carrots languishing at the bottom of the fridge. Because of that I’m particularly fond of recipes that take advantage of those wrinkled veggies hiding in the crisper drawer. This cocktail recipe is designed to make use of last week’s persimmons. They should be nice and ripe by now. Maybe even a little too ripe. But that is perfect for this cocktail. You’re using them to make a persimmon puree, so you need them soft and sweet. So drink up. And go buy some more fruit. You’ve got space in your fridge!

To make the persimmon puree, cut two very ripe, soft persimmons in half (if you’re not using the small fuyus from last week’s box then you can use one larger ripe hachiya persimmon). Scoop out the flesh and put it in a large mason jar with the juice from half a lemon. Puree with an immersion blender and pass through a fine mesh sieve to strain out any large bits.

For one drink, combine in a cocktail shaker with plenty of ice:

2 oz Bourbon
1 oz Persimmon Puree
¾ oz Maple Syrup, preferably Grade B
2 dashes Angostura Bitters

Shake until very cold, strain into a chilled coupe glass and garnish with a bit of lemon peel.

New Seeds for a New Year
From a locavore’s eating perspective, January is a mostly boring month. But from where I’m sitting it’s one of the most exciting. With the holidays behind me, I can begin planning for 2014. Planning for farmers (and for me) means one thing. Seed catalogs. Well, that’s not fair. It also means equipment repairs, and infrastructure improvements, and buying more seeding trays. But those aren’t nearly as much fun as ordering seeds.
With the ground solidly frozen and the tractors parked in the barn, January and February are the months where farmers can take a breath and think about what the fields will look like in August. Depending on the farm, many people will begin seeding in the greenhouse in March. Those seeds will become transplants that will head outdoors in April or May, usually after the threat of frost has past. 
As the local food and gardening movement has grown, so to has the interest in heirloom seeds and unusual vegetable varieties. You can see this at the market, but you can see it even more in the seed catalogs. Seed Savers is one of my favorite catalogs. They are based in Iowa and are one of the champions of long-lost heirloom varieties. In addition to selling seeds they help connect their thousands of members who save seeds from their home gardens and want to trade with other gardeners and small farms. When I first worked on a farm in New Hampshire I got to visit High Mowing Seeds, way up in Northern Vermont. They are an organic seed company specializing in varieties that thrive in colder climates. At their farm in Hardwick they grow test plots of different varieties to determine which do best. They choose their favorites based on flavor, yield, disease resistance and general health.
And then there are the specialty seed companies. Kitazawa sells seeds for dozens of Japaenese vegetables, including the stunning Akahana Mame bean, which still ranks as the coolest vegetable I’ve ever seen in my life. It is a stunning pink and purple shelling bean with a fantastic meaty flavor (I’ve included a photo from Mountain Sweet Berry Farm, where they grew a test plot this year). Franchi sells Italian varieties, including some of my favorite heirloom chicories like Castelfranco and Tardivo. And last but not least is Johnny’s. Nearly every farmer I work with relies on Johnny’s for dependable (think germination rates and robust performance) and reasonably priced seeds for everything from Tasty Jade cucumbers to Ping Pong radishes.
Quinciple is not even a year old, and yet we’ve already reached the point where we are big enough to begin doing some serious planning with our farmers for the 2014 season. I know, for instance, that we will need at least a ton of watermelon radishes. And 500 bunches of lemon verbena. At least. And don’t’ even get me started on Sun Gold cherry tomatoes. Or garlic scapes. Or purple snow peas. Or zephyr summer squash. Well, you get the idea. I’ll be sitting down with some of the farmers we work closest with, like Tamarack Hollow, and looking at some seed catalogs to try and figure out what they will grow specifically for Quinciple. And I’m hoping to do this with some new farms, who will be putting seeds into the ground for the first time this year. A significant commitment from us can help them plan a successful first season.
When people ask me what the best part of my job is I always say, “Writing big checks to farmers.” Sitting down and looking at seed catalogs is a close second. Both of those things are possible because we have an incredible body of loyal Quinciple customers who chose to put their grocery dollars towards good food from great farms. A huge, heartfelt thanks goes out from the whole Quinciple team to our customers. You’re doing your part to fuel my seed catalog addiction and so you also have my personal thanks.
All of these seed catalogs exist online. So go check out a few and feel free to send us your votes of what you’d like to see in a Quinciple box this spring.
Happy eating and happy seed hunting!
Kate New Seeds for a New Year
From a locavore’s eating perspective, January is a mostly boring month. But from where I’m sitting it’s one of the most exciting. With the holidays behind me, I can begin planning for 2014. Planning for farmers (and for me) means one thing. Seed catalogs. Well, that’s not fair. It also means equipment repairs, and infrastructure improvements, and buying more seeding trays. But those aren’t nearly as much fun as ordering seeds.
With the ground solidly frozen and the tractors parked in the barn, January and February are the months where farmers can take a breath and think about what the fields will look like in August. Depending on the farm, many people will begin seeding in the greenhouse in March. Those seeds will become transplants that will head outdoors in April or May, usually after the threat of frost has past. 
As the local food and gardening movement has grown, so to has the interest in heirloom seeds and unusual vegetable varieties. You can see this at the market, but you can see it even more in the seed catalogs. Seed Savers is one of my favorite catalogs. They are based in Iowa and are one of the champions of long-lost heirloom varieties. In addition to selling seeds they help connect their thousands of members who save seeds from their home gardens and want to trade with other gardeners and small farms. When I first worked on a farm in New Hampshire I got to visit High Mowing Seeds, way up in Northern Vermont. They are an organic seed company specializing in varieties that thrive in colder climates. At their farm in Hardwick they grow test plots of different varieties to determine which do best. They choose their favorites based on flavor, yield, disease resistance and general health.
And then there are the specialty seed companies. Kitazawa sells seeds for dozens of Japaenese vegetables, including the stunning Akahana Mame bean, which still ranks as the coolest vegetable I’ve ever seen in my life. It is a stunning pink and purple shelling bean with a fantastic meaty flavor (I’ve included a photo from Mountain Sweet Berry Farm, where they grew a test plot this year). Franchi sells Italian varieties, including some of my favorite heirloom chicories like Castelfranco and Tardivo. And last but not least is Johnny’s. Nearly every farmer I work with relies on Johnny’s for dependable (think germination rates and robust performance) and reasonably priced seeds for everything from Tasty Jade cucumbers to Ping Pong radishes.
Quinciple is not even a year old, and yet we’ve already reached the point where we are big enough to begin doing some serious planning with our farmers for the 2014 season. I know, for instance, that we will need at least a ton of watermelon radishes. And 500 bunches of lemon verbena. At least. And don’t’ even get me started on Sun Gold cherry tomatoes. Or garlic scapes. Or purple snow peas. Or zephyr summer squash. Well, you get the idea. I’ll be sitting down with some of the farmers we work closest with, like Tamarack Hollow, and looking at some seed catalogs to try and figure out what they will grow specifically for Quinciple. And I’m hoping to do this with some new farms, who will be putting seeds into the ground for the first time this year. A significant commitment from us can help them plan a successful first season.
When people ask me what the best part of my job is I always say, “Writing big checks to farmers.” Sitting down and looking at seed catalogs is a close second. Both of those things are possible because we have an incredible body of loyal Quinciple customers who chose to put their grocery dollars towards good food from great farms. A huge, heartfelt thanks goes out from the whole Quinciple team to our customers. You’re doing your part to fuel my seed catalog addiction and so you also have my personal thanks.
All of these seed catalogs exist online. So go check out a few and feel free to send us your votes of what you’d like to see in a Quinciple box this spring.
Happy eating and happy seed hunting!
Kate New Seeds for a New Year
From a locavore’s eating perspective, January is a mostly boring month. But from where I’m sitting it’s one of the most exciting. With the holidays behind me, I can begin planning for 2014. Planning for farmers (and for me) means one thing. Seed catalogs. Well, that’s not fair. It also means equipment repairs, and infrastructure improvements, and buying more seeding trays. But those aren’t nearly as much fun as ordering seeds.
With the ground solidly frozen and the tractors parked in the barn, January and February are the months where farmers can take a breath and think about what the fields will look like in August. Depending on the farm, many people will begin seeding in the greenhouse in March. Those seeds will become transplants that will head outdoors in April or May, usually after the threat of frost has past. 
As the local food and gardening movement has grown, so to has the interest in heirloom seeds and unusual vegetable varieties. You can see this at the market, but you can see it even more in the seed catalogs. Seed Savers is one of my favorite catalogs. They are based in Iowa and are one of the champions of long-lost heirloom varieties. In addition to selling seeds they help connect their thousands of members who save seeds from their home gardens and want to trade with other gardeners and small farms. When I first worked on a farm in New Hampshire I got to visit High Mowing Seeds, way up in Northern Vermont. They are an organic seed company specializing in varieties that thrive in colder climates. At their farm in Hardwick they grow test plots of different varieties to determine which do best. They choose their favorites based on flavor, yield, disease resistance and general health.
And then there are the specialty seed companies. Kitazawa sells seeds for dozens of Japaenese vegetables, including the stunning Akahana Mame bean, which still ranks as the coolest vegetable I’ve ever seen in my life. It is a stunning pink and purple shelling bean with a fantastic meaty flavor (I’ve included a photo from Mountain Sweet Berry Farm, where they grew a test plot this year). Franchi sells Italian varieties, including some of my favorite heirloom chicories like Castelfranco and Tardivo. And last but not least is Johnny’s. Nearly every farmer I work with relies on Johnny’s for dependable (think germination rates and robust performance) and reasonably priced seeds for everything from Tasty Jade cucumbers to Ping Pong radishes.
Quinciple is not even a year old, and yet we’ve already reached the point where we are big enough to begin doing some serious planning with our farmers for the 2014 season. I know, for instance, that we will need at least a ton of watermelon radishes. And 500 bunches of lemon verbena. At least. And don’t’ even get me started on Sun Gold cherry tomatoes. Or garlic scapes. Or purple snow peas. Or zephyr summer squash. Well, you get the idea. I’ll be sitting down with some of the farmers we work closest with, like Tamarack Hollow, and looking at some seed catalogs to try and figure out what they will grow specifically for Quinciple. And I’m hoping to do this with some new farms, who will be putting seeds into the ground for the first time this year. A significant commitment from us can help them plan a successful first season.
When people ask me what the best part of my job is I always say, “Writing big checks to farmers.” Sitting down and looking at seed catalogs is a close second. Both of those things are possible because we have an incredible body of loyal Quinciple customers who chose to put their grocery dollars towards good food from great farms. A huge, heartfelt thanks goes out from the whole Quinciple team to our customers. You’re doing your part to fuel my seed catalog addiction and so you also have my personal thanks.
All of these seed catalogs exist online. So go check out a few and feel free to send us your votes of what you’d like to see in a Quinciple box this spring.
Happy eating and happy seed hunting!
Kate New Seeds for a New Year
From a locavore’s eating perspective, January is a mostly boring month. But from where I’m sitting it’s one of the most exciting. With the holidays behind me, I can begin planning for 2014. Planning for farmers (and for me) means one thing. Seed catalogs. Well, that’s not fair. It also means equipment repairs, and infrastructure improvements, and buying more seeding trays. But those aren’t nearly as much fun as ordering seeds.
With the ground solidly frozen and the tractors parked in the barn, January and February are the months where farmers can take a breath and think about what the fields will look like in August. Depending on the farm, many people will begin seeding in the greenhouse in March. Those seeds will become transplants that will head outdoors in April or May, usually after the threat of frost has past. 
As the local food and gardening movement has grown, so to has the interest in heirloom seeds and unusual vegetable varieties. You can see this at the market, but you can see it even more in the seed catalogs. Seed Savers is one of my favorite catalogs. They are based in Iowa and are one of the champions of long-lost heirloom varieties. In addition to selling seeds they help connect their thousands of members who save seeds from their home gardens and want to trade with other gardeners and small farms. When I first worked on a farm in New Hampshire I got to visit High Mowing Seeds, way up in Northern Vermont. They are an organic seed company specializing in varieties that thrive in colder climates. At their farm in Hardwick they grow test plots of different varieties to determine which do best. They choose their favorites based on flavor, yield, disease resistance and general health.
And then there are the specialty seed companies. Kitazawa sells seeds for dozens of Japaenese vegetables, including the stunning Akahana Mame bean, which still ranks as the coolest vegetable I’ve ever seen in my life. It is a stunning pink and purple shelling bean with a fantastic meaty flavor (I’ve included a photo from Mountain Sweet Berry Farm, where they grew a test plot this year). Franchi sells Italian varieties, including some of my favorite heirloom chicories like Castelfranco and Tardivo. And last but not least is Johnny’s. Nearly every farmer I work with relies on Johnny’s for dependable (think germination rates and robust performance) and reasonably priced seeds for everything from Tasty Jade cucumbers to Ping Pong radishes.
Quinciple is not even a year old, and yet we’ve already reached the point where we are big enough to begin doing some serious planning with our farmers for the 2014 season. I know, for instance, that we will need at least a ton of watermelon radishes. And 500 bunches of lemon verbena. At least. And don’t’ even get me started on Sun Gold cherry tomatoes. Or garlic scapes. Or purple snow peas. Or zephyr summer squash. Well, you get the idea. I’ll be sitting down with some of the farmers we work closest with, like Tamarack Hollow, and looking at some seed catalogs to try and figure out what they will grow specifically for Quinciple. And I’m hoping to do this with some new farms, who will be putting seeds into the ground for the first time this year. A significant commitment from us can help them plan a successful first season.
When people ask me what the best part of my job is I always say, “Writing big checks to farmers.” Sitting down and looking at seed catalogs is a close second. Both of those things are possible because we have an incredible body of loyal Quinciple customers who chose to put their grocery dollars towards good food from great farms. A huge, heartfelt thanks goes out from the whole Quinciple team to our customers. You’re doing your part to fuel my seed catalog addiction and so you also have my personal thanks.
All of these seed catalogs exist online. So go check out a few and feel free to send us your votes of what you’d like to see in a Quinciple box this spring.
Happy eating and happy seed hunting!
Kate New Seeds for a New Year
From a locavore’s eating perspective, January is a mostly boring month. But from where I’m sitting it’s one of the most exciting. With the holidays behind me, I can begin planning for 2014. Planning for farmers (and for me) means one thing. Seed catalogs. Well, that’s not fair. It also means equipment repairs, and infrastructure improvements, and buying more seeding trays. But those aren’t nearly as much fun as ordering seeds.
With the ground solidly frozen and the tractors parked in the barn, January and February are the months where farmers can take a breath and think about what the fields will look like in August. Depending on the farm, many people will begin seeding in the greenhouse in March. Those seeds will become transplants that will head outdoors in April or May, usually after the threat of frost has past. 
As the local food and gardening movement has grown, so to has the interest in heirloom seeds and unusual vegetable varieties. You can see this at the market, but you can see it even more in the seed catalogs. Seed Savers is one of my favorite catalogs. They are based in Iowa and are one of the champions of long-lost heirloom varieties. In addition to selling seeds they help connect their thousands of members who save seeds from their home gardens and want to trade with other gardeners and small farms. When I first worked on a farm in New Hampshire I got to visit High Mowing Seeds, way up in Northern Vermont. They are an organic seed company specializing in varieties that thrive in colder climates. At their farm in Hardwick they grow test plots of different varieties to determine which do best. They choose their favorites based on flavor, yield, disease resistance and general health.
And then there are the specialty seed companies. Kitazawa sells seeds for dozens of Japaenese vegetables, including the stunning Akahana Mame bean, which still ranks as the coolest vegetable I’ve ever seen in my life. It is a stunning pink and purple shelling bean with a fantastic meaty flavor (I’ve included a photo from Mountain Sweet Berry Farm, where they grew a test plot this year). Franchi sells Italian varieties, including some of my favorite heirloom chicories like Castelfranco and Tardivo. And last but not least is Johnny’s. Nearly every farmer I work with relies on Johnny’s for dependable (think germination rates and robust performance) and reasonably priced seeds for everything from Tasty Jade cucumbers to Ping Pong radishes.
Quinciple is not even a year old, and yet we’ve already reached the point where we are big enough to begin doing some serious planning with our farmers for the 2014 season. I know, for instance, that we will need at least a ton of watermelon radishes. And 500 bunches of lemon verbena. At least. And don’t’ even get me started on Sun Gold cherry tomatoes. Or garlic scapes. Or purple snow peas. Or zephyr summer squash. Well, you get the idea. I’ll be sitting down with some of the farmers we work closest with, like Tamarack Hollow, and looking at some seed catalogs to try and figure out what they will grow specifically for Quinciple. And I’m hoping to do this with some new farms, who will be putting seeds into the ground for the first time this year. A significant commitment from us can help them plan a successful first season.
When people ask me what the best part of my job is I always say, “Writing big checks to farmers.” Sitting down and looking at seed catalogs is a close second. Both of those things are possible because we have an incredible body of loyal Quinciple customers who chose to put their grocery dollars towards good food from great farms. A huge, heartfelt thanks goes out from the whole Quinciple team to our customers. You’re doing your part to fuel my seed catalog addiction and so you also have my personal thanks.
All of these seed catalogs exist online. So go check out a few and feel free to send us your votes of what you’d like to see in a Quinciple box this spring.
Happy eating and happy seed hunting!
Kate New Seeds for a New Year
From a locavore’s eating perspective, January is a mostly boring month. But from where I’m sitting it’s one of the most exciting. With the holidays behind me, I can begin planning for 2014. Planning for farmers (and for me) means one thing. Seed catalogs. Well, that’s not fair. It also means equipment repairs, and infrastructure improvements, and buying more seeding trays. But those aren’t nearly as much fun as ordering seeds.
With the ground solidly frozen and the tractors parked in the barn, January and February are the months where farmers can take a breath and think about what the fields will look like in August. Depending on the farm, many people will begin seeding in the greenhouse in March. Those seeds will become transplants that will head outdoors in April or May, usually after the threat of frost has past. 
As the local food and gardening movement has grown, so to has the interest in heirloom seeds and unusual vegetable varieties. You can see this at the market, but you can see it even more in the seed catalogs. Seed Savers is one of my favorite catalogs. They are based in Iowa and are one of the champions of long-lost heirloom varieties. In addition to selling seeds they help connect their thousands of members who save seeds from their home gardens and want to trade with other gardeners and small farms. When I first worked on a farm in New Hampshire I got to visit High Mowing Seeds, way up in Northern Vermont. They are an organic seed company specializing in varieties that thrive in colder climates. At their farm in Hardwick they grow test plots of different varieties to determine which do best. They choose their favorites based on flavor, yield, disease resistance and general health.
And then there are the specialty seed companies. Kitazawa sells seeds for dozens of Japaenese vegetables, including the stunning Akahana Mame bean, which still ranks as the coolest vegetable I’ve ever seen in my life. It is a stunning pink and purple shelling bean with a fantastic meaty flavor (I’ve included a photo from Mountain Sweet Berry Farm, where they grew a test plot this year). Franchi sells Italian varieties, including some of my favorite heirloom chicories like Castelfranco and Tardivo. And last but not least is Johnny’s. Nearly every farmer I work with relies on Johnny’s for dependable (think germination rates and robust performance) and reasonably priced seeds for everything from Tasty Jade cucumbers to Ping Pong radishes.
Quinciple is not even a year old, and yet we’ve already reached the point where we are big enough to begin doing some serious planning with our farmers for the 2014 season. I know, for instance, that we will need at least a ton of watermelon radishes. And 500 bunches of lemon verbena. At least. And don’t’ even get me started on Sun Gold cherry tomatoes. Or garlic scapes. Or purple snow peas. Or zephyr summer squash. Well, you get the idea. I’ll be sitting down with some of the farmers we work closest with, like Tamarack Hollow, and looking at some seed catalogs to try and figure out what they will grow specifically for Quinciple. And I’m hoping to do this with some new farms, who will be putting seeds into the ground for the first time this year. A significant commitment from us can help them plan a successful first season.
When people ask me what the best part of my job is I always say, “Writing big checks to farmers.” Sitting down and looking at seed catalogs is a close second. Both of those things are possible because we have an incredible body of loyal Quinciple customers who chose to put their grocery dollars towards good food from great farms. A huge, heartfelt thanks goes out from the whole Quinciple team to our customers. You’re doing your part to fuel my seed catalog addiction and so you also have my personal thanks.
All of these seed catalogs exist online. So go check out a few and feel free to send us your votes of what you’d like to see in a Quinciple box this spring.
Happy eating and happy seed hunting!
Kate

New Seeds for a New Year

From a locavore’s eating perspective, January is a mostly boring month. But from where I’m sitting it’s one of the most exciting. With the holidays behind me, I can begin planning for 2014. Planning for farmers (and for me) means one thing. Seed catalogs. Well, that’s not fair. It also means equipment repairs, and infrastructure improvements, and buying more seeding trays. But those aren’t nearly as much fun as ordering seeds.

With the ground solidly frozen and the tractors parked in the barn, January and February are the months where farmers can take a breath and think about what the fields will look like in August. Depending on the farm, many people will begin seeding in the greenhouse in March. Those seeds will become transplants that will head outdoors in April or May, usually after the threat of frost has past. 

As the local food and gardening movement has grown, so to has the interest in heirloom seeds and unusual vegetable varieties. You can see this at the market, but you can see it even more in the seed catalogs. Seed Savers is one of my favorite catalogs. They are based in Iowa and are one of the champions of long-lost heirloom varieties. In addition to selling seeds they help connect their thousands of members who save seeds from their home gardens and want to trade with other gardeners and small farms. When I first worked on a farm in New Hampshire I got to visit High Mowing Seeds, way up in Northern Vermont. They are an organic seed company specializing in varieties that thrive in colder climates. At their farm in Hardwick they grow test plots of different varieties to determine which do best. They choose their favorites based on flavor, yield, disease resistance and general health.

And then there are the specialty seed companies. Kitazawa sells seeds for dozens of Japaenese vegetables, including the stunning Akahana Mame bean, which still ranks as the coolest vegetable I’ve ever seen in my life. It is a stunning pink and purple shelling bean with a fantastic meaty flavor (I’ve included a photo from Mountain Sweet Berry Farm, where they grew a test plot this year). Franchi sells Italian varieties, including some of my favorite heirloom chicories like Castelfranco and Tardivo. And last but not least is Johnny’s. Nearly every farmer I work with relies on Johnny’s for dependable (think germination rates and robust performance) and reasonably priced seeds for everything from Tasty Jade cucumbers to Ping Pong radishes.

Quinciple is not even a year old, and yet we’ve already reached the point where we are big enough to begin doing some serious planning with our farmers for the 2014 season. I know, for instance, that we will need at least a ton of watermelon radishes. And 500 bunches of lemon verbena. At least. And don’t’ even get me started on Sun Gold cherry tomatoes. Or garlic scapes. Or purple snow peas. Or zephyr summer squash. Well, you get the idea. I’ll be sitting down with some of the farmers we work closest with, like Tamarack Hollow, and looking at some seed catalogs to try and figure out what they will grow specifically for Quinciple. And I’m hoping to do this with some new farms, who will be putting seeds into the ground for the first time this year. A significant commitment from us can help them plan a successful first season.

When people ask me what the best part of my job is I always say, “Writing big checks to farmers.” Sitting down and looking at seed catalogs is a close second. Both of those things are possible because we have an incredible body of loyal Quinciple customers who chose to put their grocery dollars towards good food from great farms. A huge, heartfelt thanks goes out from the whole Quinciple team to our customers. You’re doing your part to fuel my seed catalog addiction and so you also have my personal thanks.

All of these seed catalogs exist online. So go check out a few and feel free to send us your votes of what you’d like to see in a Quinciple box this spring.

Happy eating and happy seed hunting!

Kate

Tonight Quinciple will be at our favorite Bed-Stuy wine shop, sampling a new winter cocktail and giving out some nice swag. Here are the deets: 
Kate (that’s me!) will be showing off this week’s Quinciple box, answering all your recipe questions and giving out discount codes for 10% off your first month of Quinciple. 
Prairie Rose, the wonderfully talented mixologist behind Bit By a Fox, will be giving out samples of her clementine cocktail, Oh My Darling. We’ll have recipe cards so that you can pick up a bottle of bubbly and make them at home!
Sign up for our newsletter for a chance to win a free Quinciple box! 
We’ll be giving away samples of our favorite Quinciple ingredients (think nutmeg from Grenada and roasted almonds from California).
It’s all happening tonight from 7-9 at Bed-Vyne Wine. The store is at 370 Tompkins Avenue at the corner of Putnam. Take the G to Bedford-Nostrand or the AC to Nostrand. See you tonight! Tonight Quinciple will be at our favorite Bed-Stuy wine shop, sampling a new winter cocktail and giving out some nice swag. Here are the deets: 
Kate (that’s me!) will be showing off this week’s Quinciple box, answering all your recipe questions and giving out discount codes for 10% off your first month of Quinciple. 
Prairie Rose, the wonderfully talented mixologist behind Bit By a Fox, will be giving out samples of her clementine cocktail, Oh My Darling. We’ll have recipe cards so that you can pick up a bottle of bubbly and make them at home!
Sign up for our newsletter for a chance to win a free Quinciple box! 
We’ll be giving away samples of our favorite Quinciple ingredients (think nutmeg from Grenada and roasted almonds from California).
It’s all happening tonight from 7-9 at Bed-Vyne Wine. The store is at 370 Tompkins Avenue at the corner of Putnam. Take the G to Bedford-Nostrand or the AC to Nostrand. See you tonight!

Tonight Quinciple will be at our favorite Bed-Stuy wine shop, sampling a new winter cocktail and giving out some nice swag. Here are the deets: 

Kate (that’s me!) will be showing off this week’s Quinciple box, answering all your recipe questions and giving out discount codes for 10% off your first month of Quinciple. 

Prairie Rose, the wonderfully talented mixologist behind Bit By a Fox, will be giving out samples of her clementine cocktail, Oh My Darling. We’ll have recipe cards so that you can pick up a bottle of bubbly and make them at home!

Sign up for our newsletter for a chance to win a free Quinciple box! 

We’ll be giving away samples of our favorite Quinciple ingredients (think nutmeg from Grenada and roasted almonds from California).

It’s all happening tonight from 7-9 at Bed-Vyne Wine. The store is at 370 Tompkins Avenue at the corner of Putnam. Take the G to Bedford-Nostrand or the AC to Nostrand. See you tonight!

NAUGHTY or NICE, QUINCIPLE HAS GIFTS FOR YOU
Christmas only comes once a year, so we’re pulling out all the stops. For the week before Christmas we’re offering three of our favorite seasonal treats as special add-ons: Lazy Lady cheeses and small-batch maple butter from Vermont and panettone, the classic Italian Christmas sweet bread. Buy them for your own holiday entertaining or pick them up as gifts for the foodies in your life. Current and new customers can order these until Friday December 13th (or until we sell out!). They will be delivered with your regular box on Monday the 16th or Thursday the 19th. Email us at add-ons@quinciple.com to add these to your order.
Ash-coated Goat’s Milk Cheeses from Lazy Lady FarmOne 4-6oz cheese for $11
Laini Fondilier has 41 milking does on her lush farm in northern Vermont. She makes cheese by hand nearly every day. We’ve chosen three of our favorite cheeses: Thin Red Line, Bonaparte and Marbarella. All three are made with goat’s milk and coated with vegetable ash. Perfect for your holiday party cheese plate.
Panettone from Grandaisy BakeryOne 500g panettone for $25 
My earliest memories of Christmas morning are filled with the scent of a panettone warming in the oven. Panettone is a traditional Italian sweet bread that originates in Milan. The dough takes several days to proof, creating a beautifully airy bread. It is studded with raisins and candied citron. Serve it for Christmas breakfast and then use it to make French toast the next day. 
Maple Butter from Deep Mountain MapleOne 4oz jar for $8 
Steph makes her maple butter in small batches every Tuesday. She makes it by heating the maple syrup and whipping air into it, creating a “butter” that can be spread onto toast, crackers and – my favorite – grilled cheese sandwiches. And it makes the perfect stocking stuffer! NAUGHTY or NICE, QUINCIPLE HAS GIFTS FOR YOU
Christmas only comes once a year, so we’re pulling out all the stops. For the week before Christmas we’re offering three of our favorite seasonal treats as special add-ons: Lazy Lady cheeses and small-batch maple butter from Vermont and panettone, the classic Italian Christmas sweet bread. Buy them for your own holiday entertaining or pick them up as gifts for the foodies in your life. Current and new customers can order these until Friday December 13th (or until we sell out!). They will be delivered with your regular box on Monday the 16th or Thursday the 19th. Email us at add-ons@quinciple.com to add these to your order.
Ash-coated Goat’s Milk Cheeses from Lazy Lady FarmOne 4-6oz cheese for $11
Laini Fondilier has 41 milking does on her lush farm in northern Vermont. She makes cheese by hand nearly every day. We’ve chosen three of our favorite cheeses: Thin Red Line, Bonaparte and Marbarella. All three are made with goat’s milk and coated with vegetable ash. Perfect for your holiday party cheese plate.
Panettone from Grandaisy BakeryOne 500g panettone for $25 
My earliest memories of Christmas morning are filled with the scent of a panettone warming in the oven. Panettone is a traditional Italian sweet bread that originates in Milan. The dough takes several days to proof, creating a beautifully airy bread. It is studded with raisins and candied citron. Serve it for Christmas breakfast and then use it to make French toast the next day. 
Maple Butter from Deep Mountain MapleOne 4oz jar for $8 
Steph makes her maple butter in small batches every Tuesday. She makes it by heating the maple syrup and whipping air into it, creating a “butter” that can be spread onto toast, crackers and – my favorite – grilled cheese sandwiches. And it makes the perfect stocking stuffer! NAUGHTY or NICE, QUINCIPLE HAS GIFTS FOR YOU
Christmas only comes once a year, so we’re pulling out all the stops. For the week before Christmas we’re offering three of our favorite seasonal treats as special add-ons: Lazy Lady cheeses and small-batch maple butter from Vermont and panettone, the classic Italian Christmas sweet bread. Buy them for your own holiday entertaining or pick them up as gifts for the foodies in your life. Current and new customers can order these until Friday December 13th (or until we sell out!). They will be delivered with your regular box on Monday the 16th or Thursday the 19th. Email us at add-ons@quinciple.com to add these to your order.
Ash-coated Goat’s Milk Cheeses from Lazy Lady FarmOne 4-6oz cheese for $11
Laini Fondilier has 41 milking does on her lush farm in northern Vermont. She makes cheese by hand nearly every day. We’ve chosen three of our favorite cheeses: Thin Red Line, Bonaparte and Marbarella. All three are made with goat’s milk and coated with vegetable ash. Perfect for your holiday party cheese plate.
Panettone from Grandaisy BakeryOne 500g panettone for $25 
My earliest memories of Christmas morning are filled with the scent of a panettone warming in the oven. Panettone is a traditional Italian sweet bread that originates in Milan. The dough takes several days to proof, creating a beautifully airy bread. It is studded with raisins and candied citron. Serve it for Christmas breakfast and then use it to make French toast the next day. 
Maple Butter from Deep Mountain MapleOne 4oz jar for $8 
Steph makes her maple butter in small batches every Tuesday. She makes it by heating the maple syrup and whipping air into it, creating a “butter” that can be spread onto toast, crackers and – my favorite – grilled cheese sandwiches. And it makes the perfect stocking stuffer!

NAUGHTY or NICE, QUINCIPLE HAS GIFTS FOR YOU

Christmas only comes once a year, so we’re pulling out all the stops. For the week before Christmas we’re offering three of our favorite seasonal treats as special add-ons: Lazy Lady cheeses and small-batch maple butter from Vermont and panettone, the classic Italian Christmas sweet bread. Buy them for your own holiday entertaining or pick them up as gifts for the foodies in your life. Current and new customers can order these until Friday December 13th (or until we sell out!). They will be delivered with your regular box on Monday the 16th or Thursday the 19th. Email us at add-ons@quinciple.com to add these to your order.

Ash-coated Goat’s Milk Cheeses from Lazy Lady Farm
One 4-6oz cheese for $11

Laini Fondilier has 41 milking does on her lush farm in northern Vermont. She makes cheese by hand nearly every day. We’ve chosen three of our favorite cheeses: Thin Red Line, Bonaparte and Marbarella. All three are made with goat’s milk and coated with vegetable ash. Perfect for your holiday party cheese plate.

Panettone from Grandaisy Bakery
One 500g panettone for $25 

My earliest memories of Christmas morning are filled with the scent of a panettone warming in the oven. Panettone is a traditional Italian sweet bread that originates in Milan. The dough takes several days to proof, creating a beautifully airy bread. It is studded with raisins and candied citron. Serve it for Christmas breakfast and then use it to make French toast the next day. 

Maple Butter from Deep Mountain Maple
One 4oz jar for $8 

Steph makes her maple butter in small batches every Tuesday. She makes it by heating the maple syrup and whipping air into it, creating a “butter” that can be spread onto toast, crackers and – my favorite – grilled cheese sandwiches. And it makes the perfect stocking stuffer!

PERFECT POPCORN
There is no better snack than a perfectly seasoned bowl of popcorn. In a large pot with a lid heat two tablespoons of any neutral cooking oil (sunflower, grapeseed, etc). The pot shouldn’t be too heavy because you want to be able to pick it up and shake it. While the oil is heating put a couple of kernels in the pot and replace the lid. When you hear the kernels pop, add ¼ cup of popcorn. With oven mits on, take the pot by the handles and, while holding the lid firmly on the pot, remove from the stove and shake vigorously for 10 seconds. Return to the heat. Shake every minute or so until the popping has almost slowed to a stop. Turn the heat off immediately – nobody likes burnt popcorn. Well, some people do, but not us. Add a drizzle of nice olive to the pot and shake once more. Add two tablespoons grated Parmesan and a few grinds of black pepper. Shake once more and pour into a bowl. Instead of Parmesan and black pepper try Pecorino and finely chopped fresh rosemary. Or cinnamon, sugar and a bit of cayenne. And my all time favorite: old bay seasoning. Happy munching!



 



 

PERFECT POPCORN

There is no better snack than a perfectly seasoned bowl of popcorn. In a large pot with a lid heat two tablespoons of any neutral cooking oil (sunflower, grapeseed, etc). The pot shouldn’t be too heavy because you want to be able to pick it up and shake it. While the oil is heating put a couple of kernels in the pot and replace the lid. When you hear the kernels pop, add ¼ cup of popcorn. With oven mits on, take the pot by the handles and, while holding the lid firmly on the pot, remove from the stove and shake vigorously for 10 seconds. Return to the heat. Shake every minute or so until the popping has almost slowed to a stop. Turn the heat off immediately – nobody likes burnt popcorn. Well, some people do, but not us. Add a drizzle of nice olive to the pot and shake once more. Add two tablespoons grated Parmesan and a few grinds of black pepper. Shake once more and pour into a bowl. Instead of Parmesan and black pepper try Pecorino and finely chopped fresh rosemary. Or cinnamon, sugar and a bit of cayenne. And my all time favorite: old bay seasoning. Happy munching!

 

Quince Glazed Turkey
Most people feel very strongly about how they cook their turkey. There are those who brine. And those who fry. And those who go all out and cook a turducken. If you aren’t already set in your ways, I recommend trying this simple glaze on your turkey. It creates a lovely sweet, crispy skin on your turkey. You’ll start glazing after your turkey has already been roasting for an hour or so. In a small saucepan heat ½ cup of quince preserves with 2/3 cup apple cider vinegar and ¼ cup brown sugar. Simmer until the sugar has melted and it becomes syrupy, about 10 minutes. Remove from the heat and whisk in two tablespoons of butter. Use a brush to baste the turkey with some of the glaze. Repeat that every 15 minutes until your turkey is done. If your turkey is browning too quickly you can tent it with foil. And if you really want to up the quince factor at your Thanksgiving table, you can serve your quince glazed turkey with cranberry sauce AND quince preserves. Gobble gobble!

Quince Glazed Turkey

Most people feel very strongly about how they cook their turkey. There are those who brine. And those who fry. And those who go all out and cook a turducken. If you aren’t already set in your ways, I recommend trying this simple glaze on your turkey. It creates a lovely sweet, crispy skin on your turkey. You’ll start glazing after your turkey has already been roasting for an hour or so. In a small saucepan heat ½ cup of quince preserves with 2/3 cup apple cider vinegar and ¼ cup brown sugar. Simmer until the sugar has melted and it becomes syrupy, about 10 minutes. Remove from the heat and whisk in two tablespoons of butter. Use a brush to baste the turkey with some of the glaze. Repeat that every 15 minutes until your turkey is done. If your turkey is browning too quickly you can tent it with foil. And if you really want to up the quince factor at your Thanksgiving table, you can serve your quince glazed turkey with cranberry sauce AND quince preserves. Gobble gobble!

Woo Your Guests with Cheese
Putting together a cheese plate isn’t rocket science, but there are a few tricks that can turn a lackluster snack into a stunning first course. Most importantly, your cheese should be at room temperature when you eat it. Take it out of the fridge an hour before you want to serve it. Keep it wrapped up so that it doesn’t dry out. And then think about accompaniments. I’ve included two of my favorites in this week’s box: Jan’s Farmhouse Crisps (fondly referred to as simply “Jan’s” by everyone I know) and quince preserves. I like to assemble a few crackers with a bit of Bonne Buche and a smear of quince preserves. Then your guests can assemble their own after that. I also like to serve bread with my cheese, either baguette or a nice sourdough. Make sure to thinly slice the bread, so that the ratio of cheese to bread is still balanced. And where there is bread, I like to have butter. With the herbs in this week’s box you can make a simple herb butter. Chop a tablespoon of rosemary or thyme leaves (or both) and mix them into some soft butter with a few grinds of black pepper. And I like to round out the plate with some sliced apples or pears and a couple of veggies. Baby yellow or red carrots are always nice, and thinly sliced watermelon radishes are gorgeous and add a nice spicy element. And the fun doesn’t stop there: nuts, dried fruit, charcuterie and even chocolate are excellent with cheese. I find that a nice large wooden cutting board is the best thing to serve a cheese plate on. It gives you plenty of room to arrange everything in a welcoming way. But let’s be honest, people will eat cheese even if you served it on an old piece of plywood. Happy eating!

Woo Your Guests with Cheese

Putting together a cheese plate isn’t rocket science, but there are a few tricks that can turn a lackluster snack into a stunning first course. Most importantly, your cheese should be at room temperature when you eat it. Take it out of the fridge an hour before you want to serve it. Keep it wrapped up so that it doesn’t dry out. And then think about accompaniments. I’ve included two of my favorites in this week’s box: Jan’s Farmhouse Crisps (fondly referred to as simply “Jan’s” by everyone I know) and quince preserves. I like to assemble a few crackers with a bit of Bonne Buche and a smear of quince preserves. Then your guests can assemble their own after that. I also like to serve bread with my cheese, either baguette or a nice sourdough. Make sure to thinly slice the bread, so that the ratio of cheese to bread is still balanced. And where there is bread, I like to have butter. With the herbs in this week’s box you can make a simple herb butter. Chop a tablespoon of rosemary or thyme leaves (or both) and mix them into some soft butter with a few grinds of black pepper. And I like to round out the plate with some sliced apples or pears and a couple of veggies. Baby yellow or red carrots are always nice, and thinly sliced watermelon radishes are gorgeous and add a nice spicy element. And the fun doesn’t stop there: nuts, dried fruit, charcuterie and even chocolate are excellent with cheese. I find that a nice large wooden cutting board is the best thing to serve a cheese plate on. It gives you plenty of room to arrange everything in a welcoming way. But let’s be honest, people will eat cheese even if you served it on an old piece of plywood. Happy eating!

Maple Pumpkin Cornbread
Great cornbread starts with the best cornmeal. My favorite is the one from Farmer Ground Flour. It has the most lovely texture and rich, sweet flavor. The corn is organically grown by farms in upstate New York. The cornmeal is freshly ground to order on a stone mill in Trumansburg, just north of Ithaca. I wrote this cornbread recipe as a way to use up leftover roasted pumpkin. It is moist, decadent, slightly sweet. It is perfect served warm, with a dollop of cranberry sauce and whipped cream.
1 1/2 cups Cornmeal½ cup All Purpose Flour½ Tbsp. Baking Powder1 tsp. Salt2 Eggs1 1/4 cups Milk4 Tbsp. Butter, melted½ cup Maple Syrup½ Roasted Pumpkin

Preheat your oven to 375°. Prepare an 8” inch square baking dish or a small cast iron pan by generously spreading the butter over the bottom and sides. Combine the cornmeal, flour, the baking powder and salt in a large bowl. In a medium bowl whisk together the milk, eggs, melted butter and syrup. Peel the roasted pumpkin and add the flesh to the bowl with the eggs and milk. Use an immersion blender (or a regular one) to puree the mixture thoroughly. Pour this mixture into the bowl with the dry ingredients. Use a spatula to mix together. The batter should be wet enough to pour, but still thick like gruel. Pour the batter into the pan and bake for 20-30 minutes until the top has begun to brown and the center has just set. When you touch it, it shouldn’t jiggle. Be careful not to over-bake, that will lead to dry cornbread.

Maple Pumpkin Cornbread

Great cornbread starts with the best cornmeal. My favorite is the one from Farmer Ground Flour. It has the most lovely texture and rich, sweet flavor. The corn is organically grown by farms in upstate New York. The cornmeal is freshly ground to order on a stone mill in Trumansburg, just north of Ithaca. I wrote this cornbread recipe as a way to use up leftover roasted pumpkin. It is moist, decadent, slightly sweet. It is perfect served warm, with a dollop of cranberry sauce and whipped cream.

1 1/2 cups Cornmeal
½ cup All Purpose Flour
½ Tbsp. Baking Powder
1 tsp. Salt
2 Eggs
1 1/4 cups Milk
4 Tbsp. Butter, melted
½ cup Maple Syrup
½ Roasted Pumpkin

Preheat your oven to 375°. Prepare an 8” inch square baking dish or a small cast iron pan by generously spreading the butter over the bottom and sides. Combine the cornmeal, flour, the baking powder and salt in a large bowl. In a medium bowl whisk together the milk, eggs, melted butter and syrup. Peel the roasted pumpkin and add the flesh to the bowl with the eggs and milk. Use an immersion blender (or a regular one) to puree the mixture thoroughly. Pour this mixture into the bowl with the dry ingredients. Use a spatula to mix together. The batter should be wet enough to pour, but still thick like gruel. Pour the batter into the pan and bake for 20-30 minutes until the top has begun to brown and the center has just set. When you touch it, it shouldn’t jiggle. Be careful not to over-bake, that will lead to dry cornbread.

We love a good cranberry cocktail. Prairie Rose is the talent behind Bit By a Fox. She created a few cranberry cocktails for us. Here’s her take on an Old Fashioned.
Harvest Old Fashioned
12 Fresh CranberriesLarge Strip of Orange Zest3-4 dashes Regan’s Orange Bitters or Aromatic Bitters1 tsp. Maple Syrup3 oz. Bourbon or RyeClub SodaOrange Wedge
At the bottom of a rocks glass muddle 10 cranberries, the orange zest, bitters and maple syrup with a splash of club soda. Add large cubes of ice and stir in the whiskey. Top off with a splash of soda, garnish with a speared orange wedge and a couple of cranberries.

We love a good cranberry cocktail. Prairie Rose is the talent behind Bit By a Fox. She created a few cranberry cocktails for us. Here’s her take on an Old Fashioned.

Harvest Old Fashioned

12 Fresh Cranberries
Large Strip of Orange Zest
3-4 dashes Regan’s Orange Bitters or Aromatic Bitters
1 tsp. Maple Syrup
3 oz. Bourbon or Rye
Club Soda
Orange Wedge

At the bottom of a rocks glass muddle 10 cranberries, the orange zest, bitters and maple syrup with a splash of club soda. Add large cubes of ice and stir in the whiskey. Top off with a splash of soda, garnish with a speared orange wedge and a couple of cranberries.